Yes, You Too Can Draw! – Ch 6 — The Line of Direction

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Welcome back to another chapter of Yes, You Too Can Draw! We’re going to go over another basic foundational topic, the Line of Direction. For animate objects, we’ll learn about The Line of Action.

Before we begin, let’s review what we’ve learned in the previous chapter:

What We Learned From Last Time

What is the Line of Direction?

In a nutshell, the line of direction is angle at which an object rests. The line of direction can run at any angle. This makes it useful as a composition element. (We’ll go over Composition in another chapter.) Let’s take a look at some examples:

the line of action for a pair of eye glasses

An example of using the line of action with a pair of eye glasses.

In the example of the eye glasses above, you’ll notice how the line of direction runs horizontally, from left to right. Our line of direction is base upon the perceived axis of the glasses. The axis of any object is the imaginary line that runs through the center of you’re inanamite object. Your object’s axis will also detemine the angle at which your object rests or is positioned.

A basic example of a Wacom stylus

A basic example of a Wacom stylus

A drawing of the stylus example showing the line of direction and central axis

A drawing of the stylus example showing the line of direction and central axis.

Let’s take a look at the stylus examples above. You’ll notice how the line of direction runs straight through the stylus. In the sketch of the stylus, you’ll also notice how the line of direction is also the stylus’s central axis. The axis shows the angle and direction of the stylus.

 

Multiple Axises

Did you know that an inanimate object can have more that one axis? As I demonstrated in Chapter 2, you’ll know that objects can be constructed from multiple geometric shapes. Each of those shapes will have its own axis. Take a look at the example below:

An example of a hammer with multiple axises.

An example of a hammer with multiple axises.

Okay, my hammer’s a little more than rough. But take a close look at how I broke down the hammer. Each piece of the hammer is shown to have its own axis which it rests on. This will become handy when we get in perspective. In the meantime, I want you to understand that the central axis of each shape is important to the construction of you drawings. Think of an axis as a bone, and the line of direction as a spine. This idea will become more obvious when we get into the Line of Action.

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